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Communications over the world wide doesnt depend on sytax or eloquence or rethoric or articulation but on the emotional context in which the message is being heard.
People can only hear you when they are moving toward you and they are not likely to when your wordss are pursuing them
Even the choices words lose their powe when they are used to overpower.
Attitudes are the real figures of speech '-Friedman

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Sony S2 dual screen Android tablet and Windows 7 slider due 2011

Sony is working on not one, but multiple tablets for launch in 2011 to take on the bevy of devices already announced, launched, or available.

According to “a pair of highly trusted and proven sources” Engadget claims that “Sony is also working on two rather unconventional tablet form factors including a dual-screen Honeycomb clamshell and newfangled Windows 7 tablet slider.”

The site says that the Android powered clamshell will sport a pair of 5.5-inch displays similar to the Kryocera Echo or Nintendo DSi. However, the "S2" as it is known internally, won’t look like a square block, but an “oval cylinder when closed”.

Spec-wise the site is saying that it has been told that it will be very similar in performance to the S1 with a Tegra 2 SoC and WiFi + 3G radio on the inside and front- and rear-facing cameras on the outside.

However before you get too excited, the device might not even make it to market with “One source claims that the gap between the displays should be made smaller noting that the whole project is being met with skepticism within Sony. Another source calls the S2 an outright ‘dog.’”

The site says that “Sony's plan is to ship the WiFi + 3G equipped S2 to the US, Europe, and Japan before the holidays with a $699 targeted asking price.”

As for the slider?

It will be a VAIO-branded 9.4-inch Windows 7 slider similar to Samsung's Sliding PC 7 Series and the ASUS Eee Pad Slider due in October.




Monday, March 14, 2011

China Ends America's Century Old Manufacturing Dominance

by Peter Gorenstein

Ending a 110-year run for America as the world's dominant producer, China has overtaken the United States as the world's largest manufacturer. According to economics research firm IHS Global Insight, China manufactured 19.9% of the world's goods in 2010, while the U.S. accounted for 19.4%.

This marks the first time since 1850 that China has held the crown as the world's largest manufacturer, the latest sign of the nation's economic resurgence. (See: China Overtakes Japan in Economic Clout: Is the U.S. Next?)

The U.S. “should be worried” by the news, Deborah Wince-Smith, chief executive of the Council on Competitiveness, tells The Financial Times. “This shows the need for the U.S. to compete in the future not on the basis of commodity manufacturing but on innovation and new kinds of services that are driven by production industries."

True as that might be, it doesn't mean the world's most populated country is destined to hold the crown for as long as the U.S.. China is already suffering the growing pains of higher labor costs, labor shortages and a push for better working conditions in its factories.

There is, however, plenty of reason the U.S. should use this as a wake-up call. America must recognize China is no longer just producing low-end cheap products, it's now home to many high-tech components that live in Apple devices and other consumer electronics. Thanks to better technology, education and infrastructure the Chinese will continue to move up the production food chain, including highly sophisticated weaponry.

Wages in the U.S. can't compete with those in China or other emerging markets, where manufacturing enjoys massive support from government susidies and incentives.

Is it time for American to adapt similar policies or do corporations already benefit enough for the current system?

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Remembering Gary Moore

By SILVIA TERIGI

\
This is a personal remembrance of Gary Moore. I'm sure that it reflects the feelings of many more people who loved the man and his music

I don’t want to go in details how he died. It seems he didn’t suffer, that he passed away suddenly while on holiday in Spain at Costa del Sol.

When I read this sad news I was in disbelief. Sometimes, we really feel that people who we care about or admire are eternal. Even if we don’t follow their daily lives , they are like icons of inspiration. You see them for what they did, created, built.

I have to say that Gary Moore was an icon of the blues. Many can question his way of playing his blues, rock and ballads. But he was a musician who proved he could innovate, create and adjust the music to his worldwide audience.

He was not just a musician of one country, one place, one group or style of music. He made people who weren't normally blues and rock fans live and feel his performances.

N one could deny the effect of Gary’s guitar. He had a distinct style. It was almost as though he were talking through the instrument.

When I went to an Irish Pub here in Argentina ,Downtown Matias ,I requested that they play Gary Moore, their Irish star. From that point on, anytime I went to the pub, they'd play a Gary Moore track. It was kind of their way of greeting me when I walked through the door.

People who had never been introduced to his music before commented that they could feel how intense his performances were. Because Gary Moore's music could be felt under the skin.

My sudden regret, upon learning of his death, is that I never fulfilled my wish to see him in concert. The desire to hear him live was so intense that I would sometimes dream about it.

I was introduced to his music by a friend. I immediately fell in love with his music. The stories behind every song. Lyrics that expressed, in such a delicious way, feelings that would, in my mind, transport me to another place.

He made history cause combined the blues with other musical genres, introducing fans of those styles to the blues.

As a result, a kind of culture was formed around Gary Moore, as he widened his fan base through his unique musical influence.

It has been said that Gary Moore was in love with his guitar. He and his love made music that will be enjoyed by generations of people. And, because of that, though he is gone, Gary Moore will be forever.

I don't think Gary knew himself how well known and recognized he was in place that he had never been. But his music traveled where he did not.

Gary is gone. As he sings in "As the Years go Passing," we can say, "So long, so long, goodbye." But I'd rather take from "Always Gonna Love You" and say to Gary, "I'm always gonna love you, if loving means forever." Because that describes his music. Forever.

Thanks to Billy , Richard, DownTown Matias Pub, Rick Maker who showed me always his music & Rafael Sarmiento



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As MSNBC.com's science editor, Alan Boyle runs a virtual curiosity shop of the physical sciences and space exploration, plus paleontology, archaeology and other ologies that strike his fancy. Since joining MSNBC.com in 1996, Boyle has won awards from the National Academies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Association of Science Writers, the Society of Professional Journalists, the Space Frontier Foundation, the Pirelli Relativity Challenge and the CMU Cybersecurity Journalism Awards program. He is the author of "The Case for Pluto," a contributor to "A Field Guide for Science Writers," the blogger behind Cosmic Log: Bacteria can walk on 'legs' — and an occasional talking head on the MSNBC cable channel. During his 33 years of daily journalism in Cincinnati, Spokane and Seattle, he’s survived a hurricane, a volcanic eruption, a total solar eclipse and an earthquake. He has faith he'll survive the Internet as well. alanboyle@feedback.msnbc.com

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